A Brief Tribute to I. Howard Marshall

DOMAIN THIRTY-THREE

We are all deeply saddened to hear of the recent death of one of the great New Testament scholars of the post-World War II era, I. Howard Marshall.

Professor Marshall was born 12 January 1934 and died on 12 December 2015. He was primarily educated at the University of Aberdeen (MA, BD, and PhD), along with Cambridge University (BA), and spent virtually his entire academic career at Aberdeen, where he supervised numerous students who have gone on to make contributions to evangelical scholarship. After teaching for a short time at Didsbury Methodist College in Bristol, Professor Marshall began teaching at Aberdeen in 1964 and became Professor of New Testament Exegesis in 1979, a position he held until his retirement in 1999, at which time he became Honorary Research Professor of the University. After his first wife died in 1998, he later married Dr. Maureen Yeung, who had received her PhD…

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Did Paul Meet Jesus Before the Damascus Road?

Stanley Porter has an interesting book coming out at the end of next month that looks to be an interesting read. In When Paul Met Jesus: How an Idea Got Lost in History, Porter explores the possibility that Paul had met Jesus before his famous incident on the road to Damascus. Here is the blurb for the book:

Did Paul ever meet Jesus and hear him teach? A century ago, a curious assortment of scholars – William Ramsay, Johannes Weiss, and James Hope Moulton – thought that he had. Since then, their idea has virtually disappeared from New Testament scholarship, to be revived in this monograph. When Paul Met Jesus is an exercise in both biblical exegesis and intellectual history. After examining the positive arguments raised, it considers the negative influence of Ferdinand Christian Baur, William Wrede, and Rudolf Bultmann on such an idea, as they drove a growing wedge between Jesus and Paul. In response, Stanley E. Porter analyzes three passages in the New Testament – Acts 9:1-9 and its parallels, 1 Corinthians 9:1, and 2 Corinthians 5:16 – to confirm that there is New Testament evidence that Paul encountered Jesus. The implications of this discovery are then explored in important Pauline passages that draw Jesus and Paul back together again.

This work comes from a series of lectures that Porter delivered as the H. Orton Wiley lecturer for 2014. These lectures (and a chapel service from the same period) can be found on iTunes U.

Schlatter

Happy birthday to a brilliant, brilliant man!

Zwinglius Redivivus

That profoundly gifted exegete and theologian Adolf Schlatter was born on the 16th of August in 1852. His productivity was second to none as he published commentaries on every book of the New Testament (some for general readers and some more advanced), dogmatics, ethics, devotional materials, philosophy, history, and even an introduction to the entire Bible.

Only a fragment of his work has been translated into English and consequently he is barely known (if at all). This is a real shame, as he has much to say that’s worth hearing.

Not that everyone cares for his work, or even him. Both Karl Barth and Rudolf Bultmann studied for a time under him and neither of them were very impressed. And in more recent times, Gerd Ludemann has found him wanting because of his apparent support of the Nazi party (which, I hasten to add, was not the case at all!).

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F.F. Bruce- On The Passing of Bultmann

Zwinglius Redivivus

When the Society for New Testament Studies held its annual meeting in August 1976 at Duke University, Durham, North Carolina, the secretary read out at the opening session the names of members who had died since the previous meeting. When this is done, the chairman usually invites those present to stand for a moment in respect for the memory of departed colleagues. On this occasion, when the names were read in alphabetical order, the first was that of Professor Dr. Rudolf Bultmann, and as soon as his name was read out, the audience rose to its feet as one man: such was the esteem in which this veteran scholar was held, by those who disagreed most profoundly with him as well by members of his school.

Rudolf Bultmann was appointed Lecturer in New Testament at Marburg in 1912. After four years there he moved to Breslau and then to Giessen, but…

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