Did Paul Meet Jesus Before the Damascus Road?

Stanley Porter has an interesting book coming out at the end of next month that looks to be an interesting read. In When Paul Met Jesus: How an Idea Got Lost in History, Porter explores the possibility that Paul had met Jesus before his famous incident on the road to Damascus. Here is the blurb for the book:

Did Paul ever meet Jesus and hear him teach? A century ago, a curious assortment of scholars – William Ramsay, Johannes Weiss, and James Hope Moulton – thought that he had. Since then, their idea has virtually disappeared from New Testament scholarship, to be revived in this monograph. When Paul Met Jesus is an exercise in both biblical exegesis and intellectual history. After examining the positive arguments raised, it considers the negative influence of Ferdinand Christian Baur, William Wrede, and Rudolf Bultmann on such an idea, as they drove a growing wedge between Jesus and Paul. In response, Stanley E. Porter analyzes three passages in the New Testament – Acts 9:1-9 and its parallels, 1 Corinthians 9:1, and 2 Corinthians 5:16 – to confirm that there is New Testament evidence that Paul encountered Jesus. The implications of this discovery are then explored in important Pauline passages that draw Jesus and Paul back together again.

This work comes from a series of lectures that Porter delivered as the H. Orton Wiley lecturer for 2014. These lectures (and a chapel service from the same period) can be found on iTunes U.

#QOTD: Leon Morris and his Love/Hate Relationship with Writing

I hate writing. Perhaps it is because I write as badly as I do. The tool I use most frequently is the waste paper basket. But I still write; why I wonder? To be practical money has something to do with it I imagine. But for one so far from the best seller lists there must be many easier ways of staying alive. I think the basic answer is that a writer must write. To write is difficult. Not to write is agony. I don’t like agony so I write. And I write in the hope that what I write will be of interest and of help to those who read. I write on biblical topics for these seem to be far and away the most significant. I hope that writing on these topics will bring writer and readers a little nearer to God.

Taken from Neil Bach’s Leon Morris: One Man’s Fight for Love and Truth, 79.

#QOTD: N. T. Wright (@NTWrightSays)

516MVJ+cA7L._SY344_BO1,204,203,200_I said that I had been working on this book most of my life. There was a hiatus: I did not think much about Paul between the ages of five and fifteen. But he was my point of entry. I have written elsewhere about my first experience of the Bible.19 It was 2 June 1953: my mother’s birthday, and the Coronation Day of Queen Elizabeth II. My parents gave my sister and me each a Coronation Bible (King James, of course). Mine was, like me at the time, small and chunky. My sister and I retreated to our bedroom, sat on the floor, and leafed through this extraordinary object. I had after all only just learned to read, and was not quite ready for Romans. But we came upon the letter to Philemon: a single page, with something like a real story. We read it together. That is where I began. And that is one of the reasons, though not the only one, for beginning this book where I do. The Queen is still on the throne; my mother is celebrating another significant birthday; and Philemon is still a good place to start.
From the Preface of N.T. Wright’s Paul and the Faithfulness of God.