Reading Through the Greek New Testament

I have been reading through the Greek New Testament, slowly working my way through book by book. Unlike the common read through the Bible in a year plan, I have no plan. I just read what I desire and go from there. So far, I have read 1-3 John, Ephesians, and will finish 1 Peter tonight or early tomorrow. I am not sure where I will end up next, but I have an itching for either Revelation or Acts. After that, I will again tackle Hebrews for the third time.

I have enjoyed just reading the text. I do not usually stop long enough to investigate certain grammatical anomalies, but my readings in 1 Peter have caused me to slow down and park myself on some interesting patterns. I have noticed Peter likes to bracket off prepositional phrases and the likes quite a bit. Sometimes, I see an article and then will not see what it is modifying until further down the sentence. Cool stuff. Here is a fun example of what I am talking about:

εἰς τὸ μηκέτι ἀνθρώπων ἐπιθυμίαις ἀλλὰ θελήματι θεοῦ τὸν ἐπίλοιπον ἐν σαρκὶ βιῶσαι χρόνον.

Notice the underlined text above. The  εἰς τὸ is modifying the infinitive βιῶσαι, most likely denoting purpose. Just something to chew on.

Grace and Peace…

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3 thoughts on “Reading Through the Greek New Testament

  1. The εἰς τὸ is modifying the infinitive βιῶσαι

    Are you sure? What if this is merely a typical articular infinitive in a prepositional phrase? If that’s the case, then τὸ … βιῶσαι is merely the object of the preposition without the need for making this some strangely unique constructions. And indeed, since εἰς marks movement toward something, purpose/result is still within the range here: movement toward a goal:

    Since therefore Christ suffered in the flesh, arm yourselves also with the same intention (for whoever has suffered in the flesh has finished with sin), [with an aim] toward (εἰς) living (τὸ βιῶσαι) the rest of your earthly life not for human desires but for the will of God.

    Or perhaps with slightly more respect for the word order:

    Since therefore Christ suffered in the flesh, arm yourselves also with the same intention (for whoever has suffered in the flesh has finished with sin), [with an aim] toward (εἰς)–not for human desires but for the will of God–living (τὸ βιῶσαι) the rest of your earthly life.

  2. Mike,
    Thanks for the response and clarification. I write these with the hopes that people like you would interact and carry the discussion forward. I guess my main interest with the above example is not so much with the preposition as it is with the amount of space between the article and the infinitive. I have long been fascinated with this construction, albeit I see it more with an article and participle than with an article and an infinitive. It is as if the author wants to braket off what is between the article and the participle/infinitive/noun so as not to confuse it as belonging with another element of the clause. I noticed that Peter does this quite a bit in his first epistle, and I am intrigued by this phenomenon.

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